IAC :: Remember the past, be responsible for the future

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URI: https://www.auschwitz.info/

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Welcome!

The International Auschwitz Committee was founded by survivors of the Auschwitz concentration camp. The main objective of our work: Auschwitz shall happen never again! Please feel invited to get more information about the IAC and its work.
Since we are currently moving to this new site, the english section will grow – little by little, but steady. Thank you for your patience.

 
 
Kazimierz Albin © Boris Buchholz

On the death of Kazimierz Albin

“He felt it was very important for him to be heard in Germany.”

Auschwitz survivors throughout the world are bidding farewell to their friend and brother, the Polish Auschwitz survivor Kazimierz Albin, who died 22nd of July in Warsaw at the age of 96. Kazimierz Albin belonged to the first transport of prisoners to reach Auschwitz in June 1940. Albin was 17 years old when he received the prisoner number 118 instead of his name on arrival at the death camp. From the very first moment of his imprisonment he was determined not to be overcome by fear and hatred. Instead he would try to alleviate his own fate and that of his fellow prisoners. Read more

Agnes Heller; Foto: Arild Vågen, Wikimedia Commons

On the death of Agnes Heller

We will miss her critical, illuminating mind, especially in these times

Holocaust survivors in Hungary and many other countries are bidding farewell with sorrow and gratitude to their great companion and fellow sufferer, who died July 19th aged 90 years. Agnes Heller experienced the horrors of the Holocaust from both the German and the Hungarian sides. As one of only a few from her family, she managed to escape the deportations and the gas chambers of Auschwitz together with her mother. All of her philosophical work stems from the incisiveness and clarity of these memories. Into her old age, this worldwide respected philosopher was repeatedly subjected to anti-Semitic defamations.  Read more

 
From the left: Prince Charles holding the Statue of Remembrance, Marian Turski (Auschwitz survivor), Michèle Deodat (artist and the statue designer), Hannah Pietsch (VW trainee), Laura Marks (Holocaust Memorial Day Trust) (photo: Paul Burns / IAC)

Ambassador for tolerance and humanity

Statue of Remembrance for Prince Charles

On 10 February 2017, the International Auschwitz Committee awarded Prince Charles the Statue of Remembrance – depicting the letter B. During the ceremony in London, Marian Turski said: “It is the message from the survivors to the world of today, never to give in to the darkness of hatred, but to stand up for the dignity of all people. Knowing that we have the Prince of Wales at our side as an ally is a great honour for us and a signal of hope. Knowing that we have the Prince of Wales at our side as an ally is a great honour for us and a signal of hope.”  Read More

Press conference concerning the Survivors' Bequest © Boris Buchholz

“The Survivors’ Bequest”

Preserve Remembrance – Conserve authentic Places – Assume Responsibility

Ten presidents of organizations of survivors of the holocaust signed a joint statement: the Survivors' Bequest. "We ask young people to carry on our struggle, against Nazi ideology and for a just, peaceful and tolerant world, a world that has no place for ant-Semitism, racism, xenophobia and right-wing extremism."  Read more

 
Roman Kent, President of the International Auschwitz Committee © Boris Buchholz

Roman Kent, Auschwitz Survivor and IAC-President

Nazi Prosecutions: An Unmistakable Warning

How can there be a Statute of Limitations for Nazi crimes against humanity which were of such enormous gravity and those who participated not be brought to justice and pay the price for their terrible crimes no matter how late? No one should conclude that at least the ones who took part in inflicting such unspeakable suffering should be allowed to evade justice merely because of their prolonged success in eluding detection.  Read more